vSphere PowerCLI 6.3 Release 1 – in the wild…

Yesterday VMware released PowerCLI 6.3 Release 1, this follows yesterday’s fairly exciting release of new products across the VMware portfolio including:

  • vSphere 6.0 Update 2
  • vRealize Automation 7.0.1
  • vCloud Director 8.0.1

While I am not rushing to update to the new version of vCenter or ESXi in production environments, upgrading to this latest version of PowerCLI is far less risky, so I immediately upgraded and checked out the new features.

The latest release adds the following new support:

  • Support for Windows 10 and PowerShell 5.0 – as a Windows 10 user (for my personal laptop and home PC at least), this is a welcome addition. Windows Server 2016 is just around the corner as well, so this should ensure that PowerCLI 6.3R1 works here too. Not seen any problems with running the previous version of PowerCLI on my Windows 10 machines, but at least this is officially tested and supported now anyway
  • Support for vCloud Director 8.0 – VMware are driving vCD forward again, so if you are using the latest versions, and use PowerCLI to help make your life easier (and if you’re not, then why not?), this will be a welcome addition
  • Support for vRealize Operations Manager 6.2 – there are still only 12 cmdlets available in the VMware.VimAutomation.vROps module, but this bumps up support for the latest version anyway

And adds the following new features:

  • Added Content Library support – I haven’t really got into the whole Content Library thing just yet, but this feature introduced in vSphere 6.0, and was previously only automatable through the new vSphere REST API. This release of PowerCLI includes cmdlets to let you work with the Content Library, will probably do a follow up post on configuring the content library at a later date
  • Get-EsxCli functionality updated – for those that don’t know, Get-EsxCli lets you run esxcli commands via PowerShell on a target host. This is useful for certain things which are not really possible through the standard PowerCLI host management cmdlets. This release brings in advanced functionality in this area
  • Get-VM command – this command has been streamlined to more quickly return results, which should help in larger environments

So all in all, some minor improvements, some new features, and some updates to support for newer VMware products. A solid release which will keep PowerCLI relevant as a tool in a vSphere admin’s arsenal. If you’re not already using PowerCLI, then get on the bandwagon, there are some great books and videos out there, and a fantastic community to help you along.

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Author: railroadmanuk

Currently working at ANS Group as a FlexPod Engineer, designing and implementing converged infrastructure solutions featuring NetApp storage, Cisco Nexus networking, and UCS compute. Aspiring coder, virtualization aficionado, and automator of things.

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